Ode to the forked heel

I know I saw it.  I even think I know about when I saw it.  But I can’t find it, and apparently neither can anyone else on Ravelry.

I’m pretty sure it was when I was having the issues with the sock I was making for the fair, and noticed that miscrossed cable way up there, which I have a picture of but can’t load it on the computer because my wonderful hubby who’s in FL right now visiting his even more wonderful mom has somehow put the camera cord thing that connects it to the computer in a place where neither he nor I can locate it.  And believe me, that’s saying something.

(Side note – anyone want to diagram that first sentence in that last paragraph?  No, just little grammer nerd me then, huh?)

I am the finder of lost things.  Seriously, I need a tiara.  At times, hubby will even call me from work to ask if I know where the … and he doesn’t even finish saying what he’s looking for and I’ll tell him I saw him put it in his green bag.  Or more often that he left it at home and it’s sitting on his nightstand and does he need me to bring it to him over lunch.  I get quite a few nice lunches out of it.  Of course, he may be faking it, just so he can take me out to lunch.  Yeah, I’ll go with that.

Meanwhile back at the ranch, I started looking on Ravelry for a nice cabled sock pattern that looked cool without looking too difficult.  I have no idea at this point what my search criteria were, or I’d sure do that again.  The other idea is that I was stalking group activity or friend activity and someone favorited it or started it.  Either way, I can’t find it.

What is it you say?  It was a sock pattern.  A free one with a quite unusual heel.  I really prefer the short row heel, mainly cause I feel really smart when I do one, unless I mess up, which I try not to do that often, and partly because I think it uses up way less yarn than the heel flap method.  Normally with a standard short row heel, you get a nice diagonal line going from the heel towards the ankle.  In this pattern, the line from the ankle splits off into 2 forks as it travels toward the heel.

As I looked at it, I thought, hey, that’s pretty cool.  And I thought it might help a problem I have with my short row heels: they stop too low on the back side of my foot.  When I’m done with the short rowing, I really feel like I want to start in with whatever pattern I’m doing all around the leg part, but I’ve found that if I start it right then, then the back of my shoe rubs against it in a most uncomfortable way.  So, I’ve resolved this in the past by going up around 10 rows or so and then doing the pattern.  It works, but it sure looks a little wonky.

This forked heel thing looks like it might do the trick.  I sat down this morning and tried it with some scrap yarn, and the details of what I did are here on this Ravelry thread.  At some point this weekend, hopefully tonight, I’ll reach the heel part on the sock I’m working on and hammer it out for real.  Stay tuned for updates.

Speaking of…I’m down to about a box a day.

Tissues that is.  Is this ragweed ever going to just die?

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1 Response to “Ode to the forked heel”


  1. 1 Meredith September 5, 2009 at 11:43 am

    I don’t think I’ve diagrammed a sentence since 7th or 8th grade. I’m not sure I even remember how anymore.

    If you need an example of a forked heel to look at, you might see what you have around by way of athletic socks. Most of mine have the sort of heel you describe (they all might, but I’m not going to look at all of them just to see), but I don’t think any of my dress socks do.


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